Summer Research & Innovation Program 2022

View the SRIP Webinar recording from Nov. 29 announcing opportunities for 2022 (link found HERE)

ENGAGE AS A THINKER/MAKER/DOER

Students across all NCSSM campuses accepted to the Summer Research & Innovation Program will work with NCSSM faculty on the Durham campus/virtually or with volunteer mentors off-campus for full days over 2-5 weeks of the summer while living on NCSSM's Durham campus at no cost.

Students can expect to live on NCSSM Durham campus and engage in independent or ongoing projects that develop both personal and professional skills that will have a long lasting impact on their paths to become leaders and engaged citizens. The program culminates with student presentations communicating not only their discoveries from their project, but also to demonstrate the development and growth that is an integral part of this adventure.

Summer Research Presentation_Class of 2023

To learn how to apply for SRIP 2022

To discover which opportunity best fits your interests and availability

To meet the instructor and hear details about the opportunity

NCSSM provides the following at no cost to students & families:

    • Housing

    • Academic instruction

    • Student Life instruction

    • Program administration (Mentorship & Research office)

    • Clinic, Counselor on call (emergencies only), etc.

Students & families are expected to cover costs for:

    • Meals (cafeteria and/or purchase groceries and use hall kitchen)

To request assistance with summer food costs:

    • Email NCSSM Need Based Assistance nba@ncssm.edu upon acceptance to SRIP

    • Be sure to update the Senior: Need-Based Assistance form (at my.ncssm.edu).

Summer 2022 Programs at NCSSM Durham

*Denotes residential student only opportunities

Summer Research in Humanities (2 weeks)

The goal of Summer Research is to introduce students to work inside and outside of archives and other sites of historical knowledge, allowing them to acquire a stronger and more sophisticated sense not only of textual but of material and cultural objects and artefacts. This course is inseparably critical and creative: critical, for it teaches students to interrogate the very notion of an archive, and creative, for the interrogation will lead to their own production of knowledge in the form of a research proposal. In the last ten years or so, the institutional limitations of archives have been valuably identified; however, the recognition that sites of knowledge are constructed does not imply the determination of what can be known. For if it is the work of archivists to identify, catalog and systematize, and protect the objects in their collection, it is not their job to study exhaustively all the contents of their collection. They might emphasize some objects at the expense of others, but they do not prevent the discovery of new meanings in the available items. There is always the possibility for surprise, even delight (or horror) within the site in which documents and other objects are stored.

The great opportunity, at once theoretical and practical, of the active investigation of the collections at UNC and Duke is to work with documents whose significance is not altogether clear as well as those whose significance seems peculiarly determined—so clear, in other words, that other meanings are obscured or occluded. Our focus upon archival is, however, necessarily grounded in the historical worlds of the local. In other words, the ground underneath the student’s feet, its deep histories and disruptions, will become the object of our study. What is the relation between local knowledge and global experience? How do economic and social transformations shape the more intimate, everyday forms of cultural practice and political desire in places seemingly far removed from such forces?

Trips to the North Carolina Museums of Art, Natural History, and Science, as well as more informal excursions to historical sites such as Stagville Plantation, Hayti, and to renovated and ruined factories in and around Durham, will offer further practice in the difficult pleasures of reading diverse objects (including architecture) in their relation to built space. Evenings will be spent reading, in preparation for the day’s adventures. What will advene, however, cannot be foretold.


To learn more, check out the NCSSM news article on: Critical independence and the art of questioning in NCSSM’s Summer Research in Humanities

Contact: Dr. David Cantrell (cantrell@ncssm.edu)

Student Panelist: Maddie Beard (beard22m@ncssm.edu)

Link to zoom interest meeting at 4 pm on Tuesday Nov 30 and Thursday Dec 2 (Recording linked HERE)

*can also attend interest meeting in Beall 1

**Summer Research in Physical Sciences - Chemistry (3 weeks)

This opportunity is open to NCSSM Residential Students only.

Students accepted to the program must complete a research proposal and work with Dr. Anglin at NCSSM. Students prepare for the summer program by doing background research and completing their research proposals in March-June. Guidelines for preparing these materials will be provided. The summer program includes 3 weeks in June during which students work full-time on their projects. By the end of the summer program, students give an oral presentation of their results and write a draft research paper. Students follow up in the fall by completing their research paper and, if appropriate, presenting their work at a professional conference.

Contact: Dr. Tim Anglin (tim.anglin@ncssm.edu)

Student panelist: Meghana Chamarty (chamarty22m@gmail.com)

Link to zoom interest meeting at 2:15 pm on Thursday, Dec 2

Summer Research in Mathematics (3 weeks)

This summer program is a three-week on-campus research program in mathematics. Students will form small groups to investigate a mathematical problem and communicate their findings to others. Daily activities will include whole group meetings, small group meetings, and individual work time. Students will also communicate their findings with the whole group on the last day of the program.

Contact: Dr. Philip Benge (philip.benge@ncssm.edu)

Student panelist: Caroline Miranda (miranda22c@ncssm.edu)

Link to zoom interest meeting at 3:30 pm on Tuesday Nov 30 and Thursday Dec 2 (Recording linked HERE)

Glaxo Summer Research in Biology (3 weeks)

Students accepted to the program must complete a research proposal and work with Dr. Mallory on that project during the summer. Students prepare for the summer program by doing background research and completing their research proposals in March-June. Guidelines for preparing these materials will be provided. By the end of the summer program, students give an oral presentation of their results and write a draft research paper. Students follow up in the fall by completing their research paper and, if appropriate, presenting their work at a professional conference.

Contact: Dr. Heather Mallory (heather.mallory@ncssm.edu)

Student Panelist: Caroline Lorio (lorio22c@ncssm.edu)

Link to zoom interest meeting at 4 pm on Wednesday Dec 1 (Recording linked HERE)

Summer Research in Physical Science: Physics (3 weeks)

This opportunity is open to NCSSM Residential Students only.

Students accepted to the program must complete a research proposal and work with Dr. Deardorff and Dr. Bennett on a project that can be completed from their home. Students prepare for the summer program by doing background research and completing their research proposals in March-June. Guidelines for preparing these materials will be provided. By the end of the summer program, students give an oral presentation of their results and write a draft research paper. Students follow up in the fall by completing their research paper and, if appropriate, presenting their work at a professional conference.

Contacts: Dr. Kyle Slinker (kyle.slinker@ncssm.edu)

Student panelist: Katherine Panebianco (panebianco22k@ncssm.edu)

Interest meeting will be held Tuesday Nov 30 at 2:30 pm in Bryan 440 (Recording linked HERE)

How to do a Startup: An Experience in Entrepreneurship (2 weeks)

This two-week program offers students the opportunity to learn how to do a startup venture under the direction of seasoned entrepreneurs. Through a series of entrepreneur-led workshops, students gain the practical knowledge and insight needed to start and scale a new venture. From value proposition design to building a business model, students explore the dynamics of the startup process in collaboration with entrepreneurs. Along the way, students develop the entrepreneurial mindset as they design their own nascent startup venture proposal. At its core, this summer program in entrepreneurship affords students a unique, behind-the-scenes experience of what it means to build and grow a startup.


Contact: Mr. Chad Keister (chad.keister@ncssm.edu)

Student panelist: Hannah Closs (closs22h@ncssm.edu)

Link to interest meeting at 3:30 pm on Tuesday Nov 30 (Recording linked HERE)

Summer Research in Computer Science (3 weeks)

Students accepted to the program must complete a research proposal and work with Keethan Kleiner at NCSSM. Any subject in Computer Science is acceptable. Students prepare for the summer program by doing background research and completing their research proposals in the spring. Guidelines for preparing these materials will be provided. The summer program includes a session for three weeks during which students work full-time on their projects. Students may work together on research, but each must submit their own application and include the names of each partner in their applications. By the end of the summer program, students give an oral presentation of their research and results.

Contact: Mr. Keethan Kleiner (keethan.kleiner@ncssm.edu)

Student Contact: David Bradley (bradley22d@ncssm.edu)

Link to interest meeting at 3:30 pm on Tuesday Nov 30 (Recording linked HERE)

Summer Research in Computational Science (3 weeks)

This three-week program will provide opportunities for students to learn how to conduct research using the technologies, techniques, and tools of computational science. The first two weeks will provide opportunities to learn different techniques and tools, and conduct a small mini-project. During the third week, students will have the opportunity to conduct an independent project using the computational sciences.

Contact: Mr. Robert Gotwals (gotwals@ncssm.edu)

Student Panelist: Amy Budzichowski (budzichowski22a@ncssm.edu)

Link to interest meeting at 7:00 pm on Thursday Dec. 1 (Recording linked HERE)

Summer Research & Innovation Showcase

The Summer Research & Innovation Program concludes with a presentation opportunity to showcase not only their discoveries from their projects, but also to demonstrate the development and growth that is an integral part of this adventure. The SRIP Showcase will be compile all students' submissions of a written abstract and a 3 minute video due by July 1 to communicate your summer experience.

Other communication opportunities may be available/required by SRIP instructors. All SRIP students are also encouraged to present in various competitions/conferences available throughout the academic year (including for example Science and Engineering Fair, State of NC Undergraduate Research and Creativity Symposium-SNCURCS, and Junior Science and Humanities Symposium-JSHS).

See pictures of past Summer Research & Innovation Program activities!

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